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Monday, October 25

  1. page home edited ... In the early 1850’s, Australia saw many different turning points. Convicts who had fulfilled t…
    ...
    In the early 1850’s, Australia saw many different turning points. Convicts who had fulfilled their sentence were allowed to stay in Australia and find work, bushland was turned into farm land and Australia was becoming colonised by the British Government.
    One of the most significant milestones in Australian history in the 1850’s was the official find of Gold.
    Edward{Edward_Hargraves_1.jpg}
    Edward
    Hargraves (right) was the
    ...
    February 1851.
    Finds

    {Governor_George_Gipps.jpg} Finds
    were made
    ...
    George Gipps (right) told them
    ...
    own fortune. (Pictures of NSW Governor George Gipps)
    Hargraves

    Hargraves
    originally tried
    ...
    geological similarities. (Picture of a Ship and of Ophir countryside)
    While

    {panning_for_gold_in_Ophir.jpg} While
    on his
    ...
    John Lister ( {John_Lister.jpg} right) who was
    ...
    produced gold. (Photo John Lister)
    “Hargraves

    “Hargraves
    later wrote
    ...
    incredulous amazement.’” (The Gold Rushes – Milestones in Australian History)
    Click here to find out more information on...
    The Eureka Stockade
    ...
    What life was like on the Australian Gold Fields
    
    Reference:
    Barwick, J. & J. (2001). The Gold Rushes – Milestones in Australian History. Port Melbourne Victoria: Reed Educational & Professional Publishing
    Image – Australian Map
    Fine & Rare Books Maps & Prints. (October 2010) Retrieved October 2010, from the GARWOOD & VOIGT web site: http://www.garwood-voigt.com/catalogues/australia.htm
    Image – Edward Hargraves
    Edward Hargraves. (9 September 2010). Retrieved October 2010, from eNotes: http://www.enotes.com/topic/Edward_Hargraves
    Image – Governor of NSW George Gipps
    History of Land Ownership Mulberry Grove from 1838. (29 January 2009). Retrieved October 2010, from: http://sites.google.com/a/aotea.org/don-armitage/Home/great-barrier-island-history/great-barrier-island---places/tryphena/history-of-mulberry-grove-tryphena/history-of-land-ownership-mulberry-grove-from-1838
    Image – panning for Gold in Ophir (Lewis Pond Creek)
    Panning for gold in Summer Hill Creek, Ophir. [n.d.]. Retrieved October 2010 from: http://about.nsw.gov.au/collections/doc/panning-for-gold-in-summer-hill-creek-ophir/

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    9:46 pm
  2. page home edited How it all started {Australia_map.jpg} In the early 1850’s, Australia saw many different tur…

    How it all started
    {Australia_map.jpg}
    In the early 1850’s, Australia saw many different turning points. Convicts who had fulfilled their sentence were allowed to stay in Australia and find work, bushland was turned into farm land and Australia was becoming colonised by the British Government.
    One of the most significant milestones in Australian history in the 1850’s was the official find of Gold.
    ...
    February 1851. (Picture of Hargraves)
    Finds were made before this but the Governor of NSW George Gipps told them not to report their finds as he feared that if the news got out there was Gold in Australia, people from the towns would pack up and leave in search for their own fortune. (Pictures of NSW Governor George Gipps)
    Hargraves originally tried his luck looking for Gold in California but after little success he decided to take the skills he had learnt and return to NSW Australia to try prospecting for Gold there because he noticed both California and Australia had many geological similarities. (Picture of a Ship and of Ophir countryside)
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    9:35 pm
  3. 9:33 pm
  4. page home edited In How it all started In the early 1850’s, Australia saw many different turning points. Convic…
    In
    How it all started
    In the early 1850’s, Australia saw many different turning points. Convicts who had fulfilled their sentence were allowed to stay in Australia and find work, bushland was turned into farm land and Australia was becoming colonised by the British Government.
    One of the most significant milestones in Australian history in the 1850’s was the official find of Gold.
    Edward Hargraves was the gold prospector who officially started the Australian Gold Rush in
    February 18511851. (Picture of Hargraves)
    Finds were made before this but the Governor of NSW George Gipps told them not to report their finds as he feared that if the news got out there was Gold in Australia, people from the towns would pack up and leave in search for their own fortune. (Pictures of NSW Governor George Gipps)
    Hargraves originally tried his luck looking for Gold in California but after little success he decided to take the skills he had learnt and return to NSW Australia to try prospecting for Gold there because he noticed both California and Australia had many geological similarities. (Picture of a Ship and of Ophir countryside)
    While on his way to Bathurst, Hargraves stopped at an Inn in Lewis Pond Creek. While at the inn he saw samples of quartz rock, the same that gold was found in in California. He also remembered hearing stories of Gold being found in Lewis Pond Creek two years previously.
    One morning
    Edward Hargraves,
    ...
    guide John Lister,Lister who was the son of the inn owner, set out
    ...
    bed Hargraves told Lister he would find gold under his Lister’s feet, heused the techniques he’d learnt while in California and dug a
    ...
    into the earth andearth. He then washed away
    ...
    and water to find the first official find ofand found gold. Hargraves
    ...
    another five pansfulpanfuls of soil
    ...
    produced gold. And so the great Australian(Photo John Lister)
    “Hargraves later wrote about his discovery: ‘I told Lister that there was gold under his feet, and that I would now find it. He stared with incredulous amazement.’” (The
    Gold rush began...Rushes – Milestones in Australian History)
    Click here to find out more information on...
    The Eureka Stockade
    ...
    gold rush What
    What
    life was
    

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  5. page The Eureka Stockade edited {eureka_flag_(moving).gif} {eureka_flag_(moving).gif} {eureka_flag_(moving).gif} {title_1.…
    {eureka_flag_(moving).gif}
    {eureka_flag_(moving).gif}
    {eureka_flag_(moving).gif}
    {title_1.png}
    {The_original_Eureka_Flag.jpg}
    ...
    The mining license
    The issue of the gold license was one that was around from the very beginning.
    ...
    not have thet {licence_inspect.jpg} he right to
    License checks were conducted by police on a regular basis. If a miner did not have a license or did not present it to the police then they would be rough with the miners, chain them to trees until they could be taken to prison. This led to fights between the miners and the police which resulted in more arrests.
    The murder of James Scobie & the burning of the Eureka Hotel
    ...
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2010/08/18/2986048.htm?site=ballarat&section=news (Original Eureka flag Image)
    Parry, A (2007). The Gold Rushes: Riots, Robberies and Rebellions. South Yarra: Macmillan Education Australia Pty Ltd

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  6. page Life on the Gold Fields in Australia edited ... Food The miner’s diet was very simple; it consisted of Mutton, damper (made from floor and wa…
    ...
    Food
    The miner’s diet was very simple; it consisted of Mutton, damper (made from floor and water) and tea. The mutton was sold by a butcher, who would have a tent set up in the camp; it was easy to find the butcher’s tent as it was always surrounded by flies which were swarming the mutton carcasses hanging outside. Fresh food, such as fruit and vegetables, were rare because it was not available or would spoil before it could be delivered to the gold fields. Clean water was also hard to come by.
    Health{woman_and_child.jpg} Health
    There were barely any qualified doctors, surgeons, pharmacists or dentists on the gold fields so treatment for the sick or injured was unreliable. The seasons were hard on the miners; summer was hot and with clean drinkable water being scares miners would succumb to dehydration and like sickness, in winter the miners would be working out in the rain and cold which resulted in hypothermia and dysentery, trachoma, typhoid etc. Injures such as broken bones and deep cuts would often not heal properly because they were not treated properly when they were received.
    Women and children
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    9:20 pm
  7. page Life on the Gold Fields in Australia edited ... Women and children In the first few years, women and children were scarcely seen on the gold…
    ...
    Women and children
    In the first few years, women and children were scarcely seen on the gold fields as conditions were harsh and it was not considered a place for a lady or children. They stayed in Melbourne with little money with promises from their husband’s that they would send money when they found gold. When the conditions improved, women and children joined the men on the fields; in January 1853 there were 5,000 women and children and by June there were approximately 10,000.
    Reference
    Nicholson, J. (1994). Gold! – The fascinating story of Gold in Australia. St Leonards NSW: A Little Ark Book
    Suggested Impressions and Visual Resource. [n.d.]. Retrieved October 2010, from: http://www.historyupclose.com/gold-rush/visual-resource-impressions.htm

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    9:16 pm
  8. page Life on the Gold Fields in Australia edited Life on the Gold fields {diggers_on_their_way.jpg} When the gold rush began, many people l…

    Life on the Gold fields
    {diggers_on_their_way.jpg}
    When the gold rush began, many people left their jobs to find a fortune on the gold fields. As a result, shops closed down for there was no one in the towns to work in them, nor any people to buy the products sold, schools had to close down because there were no one to teach the children and ships in the harbours lay empty as the crew and passengers were on their way to the gold fields.
    ...
    the gold fields.fi {Miners_house_1.jpg} elds.
    Living conditions
    When miners first came to the gold fields they lived in calico tents. The miner’s would sleep on makeshift mattresses which were stuffed with leaves. Outside their tent they would have a cooking fire, a bucket of water and something specific to the miners to help them identify which tent was their own, such as a flag. As time went on, bark huts and stone buildings were built to replace tents. The government built camps which consisted of a timber barracks for the soldiers as well as a log jail.
    {butchers_chambl.jpg}
    Food
    The miner’s diet was very simple; it consisted of Mutton, damper (made from floor and water) and tea. The mutton was sold by a butcher, who would have a tent set up in the camp; it was easy to find the butcher’s tent as it was always surrounded by flies which were swarming the mutton carcasses hanging outside. Fresh food, such as fruit and vegetables, were rare because it was not available or would spoil before it could be delivered to the gold fields. Clean water was also hard to come by.
    ...
    Women and children
    In the first few years, women and children were scarcely seen on the gold fields as conditions were harsh and it was not considered a place for a lady or children. They stayed in Melbourne with little money with promises from their husband’s that they would send money when they found gold. When the conditions improved, women and children joined the men on the fields; in January 1853 there were 5,000 women and children and by June there were approximately 10,000.

    (view changes)
    9:15 pm

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